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20121101
20121130
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CNNW 9
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
troops are poised at the border, ready to move at gaza. negotiations speer headed by egypt are ongoing, and tonight the united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo, just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease-fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since it began its bombing campaign last wednesday. ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. ben, how are civilians dealing with this conflict? some of those numbers we hear, 870 people injured are frightening. >> yeah, they're not dealing very well with i
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
are scrambling to try to get israel and hamas to take a step back. egypt's prime minister and president arrived in gaza today. a planned cease-fire for the visit never materialized while president mohamed morsi made it clear whose side egypt is on. >> translator: we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us. and the blood that flows from their children is our blood too. >> so most of the west, including the united states sides with israel. a nation now on the brink of staging a ground assault. israel's deputy foreign minister told cnn this morning that would trigger that move. >> if we will see in the next 24, 36 hours more rockets, launched at us, i think that would be the trigger. >> ben wedeman joins me now from the israel/gaza border. what are you seeing and hearing there now? >> reporter: it is a bit surreal here. we're in the city's marina right next to the yoko sushi restaurant. as you can see, there are people out, having dinner. seemingly to be living a normal life. but the owner of this restaurant did tell us just an hour ago they heard t
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
issue is egypt, they are supporting the palestinian tph-s this matter. we are looking at the results of the arab spring. jon: egypt now run by the muslim brotherhood of which hamas is an offshoot. >> that's right. morisi has come out in support of the palestinians. even though the rocket attacks, this violence was initiated by the palestinians. you have the camp david aeu koerbgsdz thaccords, the arab spring. the middle east is a mess. look in iran the centrifuges are still spinning. secretary panetta, and secretary clinton are in asia right now. that pivot, are we pivoting away from the challenges and our interests in the middle east, which is really a mess. jon: you worry we are leaving the israelis high and dry on this one? >> it could be. i don't know exactly what is going on with the administration. they have mad said some of the right things in sue mort of supporting israel. we are reaping the fruits of our labors in the middle east. and our policies in the middle east has been a real failure. if we are shipping through the pacific where are we going to have the planes and tank
to the american people today. >> support from egypt inside the gaza strip this morning. what are your concerns about support coming the other way and supporting hamas? >> well, we are putting pressure on hamas to top the terrorist bombings of israel. if we do, we can deescalate this operation. as for egypt. we hope very much they will continue playing the constructive role that they have v. played in the past in helping us broker a cease-fire so that the terrorist stop rocketing our civilian population. >> are you concerned though coming across the border? we have these large swaths of open area. have we seen movement, troop movements and are there any concerns that this could escalate on the ground as opposed to the air? >> well, we are very concerned about the situation. firing on jerusalem, especially before the holiday season and christmas is a very very serious escalation. we haven't had this kind of occurrence in jerusalem in over half a century. so we need to put a stop to it. we will do everything we can can to defend our population, including using ground troops if we need to. at this
the weapons to egypt and hold the egyptian government responsible for hamas abide big the truce. so it is not about what both sides don't want, because they both want to avoid war, but what they want to come out of this appearing victorious or at least gained within their own political frameworks, and this is what is difficult for the egyptian media to bring these two sides together. >> thank you, so much from gaza. be safe. >>> and now to the middle east where president obama is now in cambodia, the third and the final stop on a multiday and multicountry tour. the president arrived in cambodia at 5:00 a.m. eastern time, and becoming the first sitting u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobod
is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend our people. >> while egypt's prime minister visited gaza today in a show of solidarity with hamas, israel agreed to pause attacks, but we keep hearing more coming from there, richard, your thoughts. >> look, it's possible this escalates, but it's hard for me to see how anybody benefits. israel got out of gaza -- israel's a first-world country, a first-world economy. it doesn't want rockets raining down in the middle of tel aviv. it would be like rockets raining down on rockefeller center. israel's way beyond this and wants to move beyond this. also, this brings into play the israeli/egyptian treaty and jordan. everything now -- >> so the question is, why did hamas choose to start firing rockets into israel the way they did? >> i think for hamas -- >> to start this? >> i think for hamas, it's station identification. this is what hamas does. this is how it differentiates itself but hasn't been able to deliver the goods at home to the palestinian people in gaza. this galvanizes its space. it shows the hamas, quote, unquote, is doing somet
, fearing it could draw egypt in to that consulate. and joining us the consulate general, good to see you ambassador. >> thank you for having me. >> dave: the latest what we just said. benjamin netanyahu told the cabinet he's ready to significantly be expand its operation in gaza. is israel prepared for a ground invasion into gaza and what could incite that? >> look the mandate from the inception was to remove this strategic threat posed by thousands of rockets on israelis-- innocent israelis paralyzing our entire southern region. so the goal was to remove that threat and the mandate given to the defense forces from the government was not limited in time nor in scope. so in other words, the possibility of israel moving in with ground forces certainly exists, it depends how the operation develops on the ground. right now, hamas is firing rockets. hamas is still displaying a tremendous degree of aggression towards israel and the purpose of this operation is to eliminate that threat. >> more than 1100 rockets have been launched from gaza into israel in this year alone. just this morning, i r
rockets in any other way. of course there is some diplomatic activity going on, too, in egypt in particular, trying to organize a truce. only a 48-hour truce between israel and hamas. so there's a positive moves ahead going on trying to end this diplomatically. but not everybody is betting on that right now, alex. >> sounds like all the pieces are on the chess board for sure. thank you very much, martin fletcher. >> let's get some perspective on this crisis. joining me is military analyst general mccaffrey. is there a danger this could turn into a larger middle east war? >> no question. i think we're one step shorter of an all out ground operation in the gaza. i don't see how the israelis could top rate continued threat to huge parts of the civilian population. and then in the background, of course, we have the iranians and hezbollah on the lebanese southern border. the israelis are quite vulnerable to these rocket strikes. fit went to all-out war there would be significant israeli losses. >> all right, general, would the u.s. get involved militarily if this does escalate? >>
from gaza into the state this year alone and there is collateral damage. egypt's new government is denouncing israel's actions and causing renewed tension between the two countries. that treaty on which so much rests upon. "outfront" tonight, former chief of staff to benjamin netanyahu and senior fellow of middle eastern studies -- let me start with you and where you're standing tonight, egypt and jordan both condemning israel. your two allies in the region. they're saying your prime minister netanyahu has overplayed his hand and probably is undermining his security. what do you say to that? >> there's a wrong side and a right side. the wrong side is the side that shoots thousands of missiles on civilians. what israel is doing now is the right thing. weaver defending ourselves. that's the right thing to do. >> is neftali right? there's a wrong side and a right side? >> it's not as simple as that. it's not as black and white as that, unfortunately. on the other side, there are also people who are dying. 20 people have died today. dozens more injured and i suspect overnight, we wi
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)